April 20, 2018

Dear Environmentalists—Let’s Embrace Both Individual and Systemic Change

Raychel Santo

Raychel Santo

Sr. Research Program Coordinator

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

US postage stamp from the 1970s.

Back in October 2011 I participated in Project Green Challenge, a transformational eco-lifestyle and leadership competition for students. (You can even watch my embarrassing video highlighting the experience). The extensive daily challenges I was faced with, from carrying all the trash I generated around with me and assessing the ingredients in my cleaning products to bringing e-cycling boxes to dorms and lobbying for reusable to-go containers in dining halls, cemented into my consciousness the realities of nearly every global environmental issue. Therefore, it was upsetting when I was invited out to California as a finalist for the competition and realized that the ecological footprint of that single roundtrip flight Read More >

April 10, 2018

FoodSpan in the Classroom: Teaching the Hunger Gap at Patterson High School

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

“Who hasn’t had lunch yet? Is anyone here hungry?”

Melissa Apolenis, a graduate student at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, opened class with these questions, intending to make her students think about how hunger personally affects them. The class was composed of Ms. Caprice Davis’s 11th grade nursing students and Ms. Porshia Seymour’s pharmacy tech students.

The students and Ms. Apolenis, as well as her colleagues Maria Claver and Jacqueline Castille, also graduate students Read More >

March 15, 2018

Is Iowa Gaining Traction against the Hog Industry?

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

DeSoto Lake, Iowa

Call it what you will: a crossroads, a turning point, a tipping point. Iowans might simply call it progress, or rather, the prospect of progress. After more than 20 years of pushing back against the industrial-scale hog-raising operations in their communities, grassroots organizations might be making the behemoth budge.

Until recently, the corporate hog industry in Iowa has been impenetrable. Twenty-three years ago, in 1995, the state passed legislation that allows confined animal feeding operations, also called CAFOs or “confinements,” to exist. There was very little public outcry, and hundreds of confinements popped up, mostly in northern Iowa. Read More >

March 14, 2018

Going Further with Food

Jessi Silverman

Jessi Silverman

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Happy Registered Dietitian Day! As a nutrition and dietetics student, I am thrilled that this year’s National Nutrition Month®, an initiative of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, has a sustainability message: “Go Further with Food.” The idea is to maximize the health benefits of your food choices while minimizing wasted food.

As you likely have heard, wasted food is an enormous problem—the US Department of Agriculture estimated that a stunning 31 percent of food is sent to landfills by retail outlets and consumers. Read More >

March 13, 2018

CLF Aquaculture News: March 2018

Dave Love

Dave Love

Associate Scientist, Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

An Atlantic salmon escape in summer 2017 in Washington state was worse than previously thought, reports Lynda Vapes. An investigation by the Washington State’s departments of Ecology, Fish and Wildlife, and Natural Resources found that Cooke Aquaculture underreported the number of escaped fish: 263,000 fish, not 130,000 as first reported. The company reported the reason for the escape was strong tides associated with the solar eclipse, but the state investigation found that poor maintenance and cleaning of net pens was to blame. State regulators then fined Cooke Aquaculture $332,000 for violating their permit. Read more at Seattle Times. Read More >

March 6, 2018

Ajax Eastman, Wildlands Warrior, 1933 – 2018

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Gunpowder Falls State Park

In 1939, a six-year-old girl went for the first time to sleep-away camp on the shores of Sebago Lake in Maine, where her four older siblings were campers. She was the youngest child at camp but unafraid, and when her camp counselor asked her name, she told him “Alice June,” after her grandmothers. “Alice June” was contracted to “A.J.,” and then at a weekly council fire the director pronounced her “Ajax the Mighty,” after the Greek mythological character. She remained “Ajax” until her death last week, at the age of 84.

Ajax Eastman married, raised four sons, and worked tirelessly—without pay—for environmental issues, especially the establishment of wildands in Maryland. As one of a group of fearless women who championed environmental issues Read More >

February 27, 2018

Intriguing Findings from Farm Market Data

Isha Pandya

Isha Pandya

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Thanks to the booming import market, we can usually find off-season fruits and vegetables at the grocery store (berries in winter!)—but the import market can be economically detrimental to farmers. Farmers who market their products locally face undue competition from high-demand, off-season produce. But local marketing efforts, such as farmers markets and community supported agriculture, can be extremely beneficial for enhancing the rural economy and empowering agricultural producers and markets. It also provides consumers with direct knowledge of where our food is coming from− something that is not always provided at our local grocery store.

In 2016, the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) conducted a Local Food Marketing Practices Survey to quantify the amount of local food sales that occur across the country. Read More >

February 21, 2018

Air Monitoring Legislation May Be Path Forward for Health on Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

For years, residents of the Eastern Shore of Maryland have been asking their local legislators and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to help them with a local problem. They live in communities that are home to industrial-scale poultry operations, where hundreds of thousands of birds are raised in chicken houses next to residential neighborhoods, and they feel that their health is suffering as a result. The stench from the chicken houses is bad enough, they say, but they must also contend with health problems such as asthma and persistent sinus infections, runny noses and headaches that they believe are a result of those poultry operations. Are their health problems caused by the ammonia and other pollutants blown from chicken houses through exhaust fans? There aren’t enough data to answer that question. Read More >

February 12, 2018

Gauging Commitment to Nutrition in Trump’s FDA

Jessi Silverman

Jessi Silverman

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

How much does menu labeling contribute to healthy eating?

Since President Trump was inaugurated 13 months ago, no one has been expecting his administration to champion nutritious food, especially in comparison to the Obama administration, which was more active than any other with respect to policies to encourage healthful eating and reduce diet-related disease. (The Obama years were marked by the Let’s Move campaign, the passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, mandatory menu-labeling as part of the Affordable Care Act, and a pretty substantial overhaul of the Nutrition Facts label on food packaging.) Read More >

January 18, 2018

Who Will Run the Future Farms?

Laura Genello

Laura Genello

Guest Blogger

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Do a Google image search for the future of farming, and you’ll find designs for towering vertical farms, aquaponics greenhouses, crop-monitoring drones and harvesting robots. The images are a testament to human creativity. But what’s often missing from the discussion of the future of agriculture is an answer to the question of who will run these future farms.

In many developed countries, young people from farming families continue to leave the farm, and older farmers find themselves without a successor. In both the US.and the Netherlands, there is a shortage of young farmers. Read More >