Posts by:

Joanna Mackenzie

Joanna Mackenzie

Research Assistant, Food System Policy

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Changing the Menu: Highlights from America Answers Conference

Panelists at Changing the Menu: Tamar Haspel, Ricardo Salvador, Marion Nestle, Phil Lempert

Panelists at Changing the Menu: Tamar Haspel, Ricardo Salvador, Marion Nestle, Phil Lempert

This post is co-authored by Kate McCleary and Joanna Mackenzie.

How are millennials driving food trends? Do we really vote with our forks? Are junk food taxes regressive? These are some of the questions that bubbled up at America Answers: Changing the Menu, a conference hosted by the Washington Post. The conference featured policy makers, community advocates, industry leaders and other food and nutrition experts, each of whom contributed a unique perspective to the conversation on how to improve what Americans eat. CLF Read More >

Thoughts on the Annapolis Summit 2015

Downtown Annapolis and Spa Creek, leading into the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay.

Downtown Annapolis and Spa Creek, leading into the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay.

Last week, I attended the Annapolis Summit 2015, hosted by the Marc Steiner radio show, where I had the opportunity to hear Maryland’s top elected officials, including Governor Hogan and Attorney General Frosh, speak about topics important to voters, such as education, gun violence, the environment, and the state budget. I was pleased that the health of the Chesapeake Bay came up multiple times in the audience’s questions. However, a common theme that emerged from the summit discussions was the tension between protecting the sustainability and health of the environment, and meeting short-term economic goals for growth and development, Read More >

What Is the Deal with WOTUS?

Blue-green harmful algae blooms

Blue-green harmful algae blooms

With the new senators and representatives reporting to Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed Waters of the United States Rule (WOTUS) may be in jeopardy. WOTUS seeks to clarify the scope of the Clean Water Act, which makes it the target of attacks by incoming lawmakers. This post provides the inside scoop on why that’s bad news, and why the nation’s most vulnerable and undervalued waters are vital to us all.

The Clean Water Act, which was passed in 1972, authorized the federal government to protect the navigable waters of the United States. It was instrumental in cleaning up many of our Read More >

Fact or Fiction: Public Health Risks and Immigration

Weeding sugar beets near Ft. Collins, 1972.

Weeding sugar beets near Ft. Collins, 1972.

Opponents of immigration reform have jumped on the Ebola crisis, stigmatizing immigrants regardless of whether they came from an Ebola-affected country or not. These opponents falsely claim that immigrants, especially undocumented ones, are a risk to the public’s health due to all the nasty diseases they might be carrying!

In fact, the real risk to public health comes from the environmental and working hazards that immigrants, who make up 72% of the agricultural workforce in the United States, are exposed to on a daily basis while maintaining our nation’s food supply. (The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future recently called for action to address the public health risks that immigrant and migratory agricultural workers are Read More >