Is the food policy pasture greener in New Zealand?

Anne Palmer

Anne Palmer

Program Director

Food Communities & Public Health Program

A failing dairy industry. Streams polluted by animal manure. Consolidated food retail, inadequate slaughter facilities for small- and medium-size producers, the list goes on. Where am I? New Zealand. Yep. Before I stepped foot on the soil, I was cautioned that I should not believe the “cleaner, greener” moniker. I’m not sure if it was heartening to blow up the myth and realize we are all suffering from industrialization of the food system, or just depressing that problems in the food system are dispersed so far and wide. Read More >

Food Systems Advocacy in Rural America: Don’t Say Environment

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

“We don’t say the word ‘environment,’” says Mark Winne about his food systems work in rural regions. “If we have to bring it up, we talk about ‘clean air’ and ‘clean water.’”

The cultural schisms in the U.S.— rural versus urban, liberal versus conservative—are hardly new. So what’s the best way to make positive, progressive food system change in rural, politically right-leaning communities? The people who have been negotiating this divide through food policy councils (FPCs), task forces or other multi-stakeholder initiatives have advice. Read More >

CLF at the Future Harvest CASA Conference 2017

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Photo by Future Harvest.

Sometimes electrical wiring saves the chickens. Radish plants can feed the soil in winter.

These pearls of wisdom and many others were shared earlier this month at the 2017 Future Harvest Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture (CASA) Conference. Three CLF staffers attended sessions at the conference to broaden their perspectives on how food systems can be improved to become not only more resilient but more profitable. Here are some of the things we learned. Read More >

Inviting Arts and Creativity into Food Policy Councils

Anne Palmer

Anne Palmer

Program Director

Food Communities & Public Health Program

A better title for this post might be “More Bubbles, Less PowerPoint,” because that was my greatest takeaway from the conference I attended in Minneapolis and Red Wing, Minnesota, in late November/early December. To that point—

Bing! As I hurried to catch the elevator, Melvin held the door and greeted me with an electric smile. His bright yellow African-print shirt was a welcome contrast to the rain in Minneapolis. I didn’t know we were both headed to the Convening of Food Network leaders’ meeting on the second floor. He was blessing colorful packages of blowing bubbles, the kind I used to buy for my sons’ birthday parties, to use at the start of the event. Read More >

Inspire Students to Take Action Against Hunger

Colson Campbell

Colson Campbell

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

foodspan-hungerFor many people, the holiday season is a fun time, celebrating with family, friends and food. But this is not the case for everyone—and teachers can help students learn about food insecurity and raise awareness of hunger. Despite the ease with which many of us buy, prepare and eat delicious meals during the holidays, one in seven households in the United States suffers from food insecurity. What does food insecurity in a household Read More >

Policy in Action: Bringing a Grocery Store to East Baltimore

Kristin Dawson

Kristin Dawson

Guest Blogger

Baltimore Development Corporation

producesalHave you ever considered getting up before dawn to stand in line for a new grocery store? Residents in East Baltimore did just that on November 3, 2016, to welcome the Save a Lot opening at 2509 East Monument Street. The line to enter the store extended down the block and around the corner well before the store was scheduled to open at 7am.

This area of East Baltimore was one of the most entrenched food deserts in the city before the Save a Lot opened. It had been years Read More >

Climate Is Changing – So Should Food and Agriculture

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

world-food-day-beansOn October 16, 1945, the United Nations created the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) with the goal of freeing humanity from hunger and malnutrition and effectively managing the global food system. World Food Day celebrates that event, and last September at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 193 countries together pledged to end hunger in the next 15 years.

The global goal for achieving Zero Hunger by 2030 is an ambitious goal that cannot be reached without addressing climate change. Climate change affects the poor disproportionately Read More >

Nepal and Nutrition: Bringing More to the Table

Elena Broaddus

Elena Broaddus

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

nepal-conf-2016

This blogpost was co-authored by Elena Broaddus & Swetha Manohar.

In countries like Nepal millions of people rely on subsistence agriculture for the vast majority of their food. Naturally, low-income nations, like Nepal, face complex nutrition challenges. Is it possible to address these challenges from a food systems perspective? Doing that requires understanding the links between environment, food production, distribution and use—and furthermore, how these linkages are shaped by complex social structures and market factors. Yet rarely do experts in all of these areas come together in one place. Read More >

Uncomfortable Questions about Urban Ag

Claire Fitch

Claire Fitch

Program Officer, Food System Policy Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

This blogpost was co-authored by Claire Fitch and Carolyn Hricko.

urbanagtweet1Urban agriculture is a topic that can get tricky, fast. Once the glow of growing food in urban spaces fades, big, complex questions arise: What are the goals? Who is it serving? Who is, and will be, the face of urban agriculture? With Farm Bill discussions ramping up, these questions become even more important. Read More >

A Taste of the Caribbean in Pimlico

Jelani Robinson

Jelani Robinson

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Island Food Market, Baltimore, 2016 / Jelani Robinson.

Island Food Market, Baltimore, 2016 / Jelani Robinson.

Over the summer of 2016, CLF’s Map Team interns visited every known food store in Baltimore City to collect data for the Healthy Food Availability Index (HFAI)—but they also took time to interview some of the store owners and learn about their challenges and successes. Here’s the fourth of those stories. 

Just outside of Baltimore’s notorious Pimlico Race Track at 5318 Park Heights Avenue is where you’ll find Island Food Market. The small international market corner store is owned by a couple I’ll refer to as Mr. and Ms. Gray in this post. The windows are covered with pictures of fresh fruits and vegetables and above the store is a blue and white sign that reads “Island Food Market, Bringing Home to You.” Upon entering the store I was welcomed by warm smiles, the sweet aroma of fresh Caribbean spices and a rainbow of brightly colored fresh produce. Although the store was small, the space was well used. With only enough space for two aisles, they manage to fit in plenty of fresh produce, a deli section for meats, cheese and dairy products, and an extensive variety of other international food products. Read More >