October 20, 2016

CLF Aquaculture Links: October 2016

Dave Love

Dave Love

Associate Scientist, Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

AQ-news-300The National Organic Program is reviewing whether food crops grown in soilless hydroponic and aquaponic systems should be considered for certification and labeling as USDA Organic. If you would like to submit a public comment, the written deadline is October 26th, oral comments via webinar can be made November 3rd, and in-person comments can be made at the meeting Nov 18th. Read the full Hydroponic and Aquaponic Task Force report.

Hurricane Matthew has inundated and submerged dozens of industrial animal production sites in Eastern North Carolina. Swine lagoons burst following Hurricane Floyd that hit the region in 1999, which led to influx of phosphorus, nitrogen, algal blooms in coastal estuaries and large fish kills.  Stay tuned in the coming weeks to months to track the impact Hurricane Mathew will have on downstream industries including recreational and commercial fisheries and aquaculture. Read more at the Washington Post. Read More >

October 17, 2016

Climate Is Changing – So Should Food and Agriculture

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

world-food-day-beansOn October 16, 1945, the United Nations created the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) with the goal of freeing humanity from hunger and malnutrition and effectively managing the global food system. World Food Day celebrates that event, and last September at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit 193 countries together pledged to end hunger in the next 15 years.

The global goal for achieving Zero Hunger by 2030 is an ambitious goal that cannot be reached without addressing climate change. Climate change affects the poor disproportionately Read More >

October 13, 2016

Nepal and Nutrition: Bringing More to the Table

Elena Broaddus

Elena Broaddus

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

nepal-conf-2016

This blogpost was co-authored by Elena Broaddus & Swetha Manohar.

In countries like Nepal millions of people rely on subsistence agriculture for the vast majority of their food. Naturally, low-income nations, like Nepal, face complex nutrition challenges. Is it possible to address these challenges from a food systems perspective? Doing that requires understanding the links between environment, food production, distribution and use—and furthermore, how these linkages are shaped by complex social structures and market factors. Yet rarely do experts in all of these areas come together in one place. Read More >

October 12, 2016

Uncomfortable Questions about Urban Ag

Claire Fitch

Claire Fitch

Program Officer, Food System Policy Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

This blogpost was co-authored by Claire Fitch and Carolyn Hricko.

urbanagtweet1Urban agriculture is a topic that can get tricky, fast. Once the glow of growing food in urban spaces fades, big, complex questions arise: What are the goals? Who is it serving? Who is, and will be, the face of urban agriculture? With Farm Bill discussions ramping up, these questions become even more important. Read More >

October 11, 2016

So You Want to Raise a Vegan Child

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

school lunchWhen you have an infant, you are in complete control of what you give your child. The ball is in your court to make sure they have a balanced diet. Between the ages of 6 to 12 months, adequate protein intake is critical because of rapid growth and the use of supplementary foods.

As they become toddlers, your child may become more “choosey.” It is common for a toddler to want to eat only a few types of food. Even at a young age you can involve him/her in choosing and preparing the food you eat. Making food fun by dipping Read More >

September 29, 2016

Can Kids Go Vegan?

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

2015-petition-schoollunchLast month in Italy a policymaker proposed a bill that would jail parents who impose a vegan diet on their children. The bill came on the heels of high-profile cases in which children were hospitalized for malnutrition as a result of vegan diets.

Is this extreme, or do children need meat in order to get enough protein, calcium and vitamin B-12? The popularity of vegan and vegetarian diets among young adults is growing. Read More >

September 28, 2016

A Taste of the Caribbean in Pimlico

Jelani Robinson

Jelani Robinson

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Island Food Market, Baltimore, 2016 / Jelani Robinson.

Island Food Market, Baltimore, 2016 / Jelani Robinson.

Over the summer of 2016, CLF’s Map Team interns visited every known food store in Baltimore City to collect data for the Healthy Food Availability Index (HFAI)—but they also took time to interview some of the store owners and learn about their challenges and successes. Here’s the fourth of those stories. 

Just outside of Baltimore’s notorious Pimlico Race Track at 5318 Park Heights Avenue is where you’ll find Island Food Market. The small international market corner store is owned by a couple I’ll refer to as Mr. and Ms. Gray in this post. The windows are covered with pictures of fresh fruits and vegetables and above the store is a blue and white sign that reads “Island Food Market, Bringing Home to You.” Upon entering the store I was welcomed by warm smiles, the sweet aroma of fresh Caribbean spices and a rainbow of brightly colored fresh produce. Although the store was small, the space was well used. With only enough space for two aisles, they manage to fit in plenty of fresh produce, a deli section for meats, cheese and dairy products, and an extensive variety of other international food products. Read More >

September 21, 2016

A Back to Basics Grocer

Ashley Xie

Ashley Xie

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Inside Mill Valley General Store, Baltimore Md.

Inside Mill Valley General Store, Baltimore Md.

Over the summer of 2016, CLF’s Map Team interns visited every known food store in Baltimore City to collect data for the Healthy Food Availability Index (HFAI)—but they also took time to interview some of the store owners and learn about their challenges and successes. Here’s the third of those stories. 

Tucked away in the Baltimore neighborhood known as Remington, in what used to be a broom machine factory, the Mill Valley General Store is a modest, unassuming brick storefront just off the I-83 exit ramp. What started as a small shop in Hampden in 2002 has become a spacious neighborhood grocery store and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) pickup site. Read More >

September 15, 2016

Is WIC an Option for Corner Stores?

Bengucan Gunen

Bengucan Gunen

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Ashley talks with some some people at Linden Market.

Over the summer of 2016, CLF’s Map Team interns visited every known food store in Baltimore City to collect data for the Healthy Food Availability Index (HFAI)—but they also took time to interview some of the store owners and learn about their challenges and successes. Here’s the second of those stories. 

Of the approximately 621,000 people living in Baltimore, 25 percent live in food deserts. Within the span of three months, my HFAI team visited roughly 1,000 food retail outlets in Baltimore. We went into corner stores, small groceries, supermarkets, gas stations and pharmacies, visiting between 60 and 90 stores every week. Read More >

September 14, 2016

CLF Aquaculture Links: September 2016

Dave Love

Dave Love

Associate Scientist, Public Health & Sustainable Aquaculture Project

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

AQ-news-300A shocking discovery of forced labor was discovered among the Hawaiian fishing fleet. The results of an AP investigation calls into question the ethics of the fishing industry. Wholesalers and retailers on the West Coast are scrambling to identify whether their products were caught with forced labor. Read more at the AP.

The third annual Our Ocean conference, hosted by the U.S. State Department, is scheduled for September 15 – 16 in Washington D.C. Foci for the conference will be marine protected areas, ocean pollution, climate change, and sustainable fisheries including traceability. Read more at the Our Ocean conference website. Read More >