January 14, 2019

New York Town Goes Meatless, Wants to Do It Again

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

How do you inspire a community to give up meat one day a week for 12 weeks? In Bedford, New York, where more than 300 households took up the Bedford 2020 Meatless Monday challenge last year, some of the motivation came from learning the connections between meat and climate change.

Working with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) and the Meatless Monday campaign, the environmental grassroots group known as Bedford 2020 was able to offer science-based information that moved the community. One of the promotions from the challenge reads: “Global livestock productions creates more greenhouse gas than the entire transportation sector.” Read More >

January 7, 2019

Food Trends to Make an Impact in 2019

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

As you make resolutions and goals for 2019, what’s on your radar? Climate change and our planet’s health are big news stories these days, but if you are like most people, they likely feel unconnected to your daily life, or just plain overwhelming. After all, climate change is a story that began during the Industrial Revolution, as global policies and practices since then have contributed to growing emissions and environmental degradation —and much of that environmental degradation can be attributed to large corporations and businesses. In fact, since 1988 more than half of global greenhouse gas emissions can be traced to only 25 corporate and state producers, according to the Carbon Majors Report. But animal agriculture also plays a major role, with 14.5 percent of global greenhouse gases attributed to the production of animals for food. Clearly, the most significant solutions rest in the hands of policymakers and industry—but there’s a lot consumers can do, too. Read More >

January 2, 2019

Policies and Resources: Poultry Production on Delmarva

Jennifer Anderson

Jennifer Anderson

Research Assistant

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

My introduction to the Delmarva Peninsula occurred during a lecture in which Dr. Meghan Davis presented some incredible statistics about the region. Dr. Davis described Delmarva as having one of the highest densities of poultry production in the world. Sadly, this concentration of poultry production is generating large amounts of agricultural runoff (manure, nitrogen, etc.) that pollutes the Chesapeake Bay.1 The runoff creates marine dead zones (areas unable to sustain life due to dissolved oxygen depletion2) and alters the microbial compositions and ecosystem functions within the bay.1,3 I subsequently learned that many Delmarva farmers are unhappy with the predominant model of poultry production in the region and its detrimental effects. What inhibits these farmers from adopting alternative production models? Read More >

December 10, 2018

Enlightenment in the Food System Lab

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

“Before I started at the Center for a Livable Future,” says Kenai McFadden, “I didn’t even know what a food system is.”

A Bloomberg School graduate student focusing on Health Education and Health Communication, Kenai’s full-time field placement at the Food System Lab has piqued new interests and expanded the way he thinks about community health.

The Food System Lab is an urban teaching farm in Baltimore City that operates on the grounds of Baltimore’s Cylburn Arboretum. Read More >

November 5, 2018

Joyce Smith, 1952 – 2018

Christine Grillo

Christine Grillo

Contributing Writer

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

The Baltimore food community will deeply miss one of its most passionate members, Joyce Smith, who died recently of heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital at the age of 66. She was known and loved by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) for all of her work on behalf of her community, and toward making food systems healthier, more resilient and more equitable.

In her role as a community relations coordinator at the CLF, she connected researchers and food system reform advocates to her community through Operation ReachOut SouthWest (OROSW), which she helped to found. As part of OROSW’s strategic plan, the CLF partnered with Joyce to conduct the first community food assessment in Baltimore. Read More >

September 27, 2018

What Do We Do with All This Poop?

Lacey Gaechter

Lacey Gaechter

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Figure 1. Click to enlarge.

This post is the third in a series—Connecting Agriculture Policy to Your Health—by CLF-Lerner Fellow Lacey Gaechter.

What do we do with all this poop? This question has been central to the field of public health since its very inception. John Snow, the “father of public health,” ended a nineteenth-century cholera epidemic in London by deducing that the source of this disease was drinking water contaminated with sewage.

This important question is also part of the current debates in the joint House and Senate conference committee (see figure 1) on the 2018 Farm Bill. In this case, the poop under consideration is from farmed animals instead of humans. The House version of the next Farm Bill would Read More >

June 13, 2018

Meating of the Mind

Becky Ramsing

Becky Ramsing

Senior Program Officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Does what you eat affect how well you think or whether you will develop dementia later in life?

Recently, researchers have explored the connection between diet and a healthy brain. Such studies focus on Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and dementia, but several have attempted to look at concentration and performance on tests or other intellectual tasks. While some results point to low or high consumption of a single nutrient such as omega-3 fats or vitamin B12, or a single food, such as olive oil or fish, the reality is that people eat foods in combination. The food we eat may have additive synergistic effects or even negative effects on health. Read More >

June 12, 2018

Soil v Dirt: A National Public Health and Policy Issue

Lacey Gaechter

Lacey Gaechter

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

This post is the second in a series—Connecting Agriculture Policy to Your Health—by CLF-Lerner Fellow Lacey Gaechter.

In college, I rocked some Girls Love Dirt mountain biking socks, and the environmental club I founded was called Dirt First, a Simpsons reference for those of you who are fans. Let there be no mistake: this woman still loves dirt, but for growing food, dirt is not our best option. For that, we really want soil. Read More >

June 6, 2018

Getting a Handle on Excessive Consumption with Meatless Monday

Martin Bloem

Martin Bloem

Director

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

This post appeared first on the EAT Stockholm Food Forum blog on 5 June, 2018.

The work that my colleagues and I do is focused on building a better food system—but what we are really trying to do is build a better world. The goal is simple: we want a healthier planet with healthier people living on it. The problems we tackle to work toward our goal, however, are rather complex. We tackle challenges such as nutrition, food security, environmental stewardship and land use—and while diet and food production have critical roles to play in each of these challenges, there’s no single solution. Ultimately, we need to think about systems of solutions. And reducing how much meat we consume is one part of that system. Read More >

May 29, 2018

The Newly Passed FARM Act Makes Unreported Farm Pollutants Legal Again

Lacey Gaechter

Lacey Gaechter

CLF-Lerner Fellow

Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

This post is the first in a series—Connecting Agriculture Policy to Your Health—by CLF-Lerner Fellow Lacey Gaechter.

Last year the US District Court of Appeals took a huge step forward to protect public health from pollutants released by industrial-scale livestock facilities. This March, however, Congress negated the Court’s ruling when it passed the FARM Act. It was easy to miss this undermining of the 2017 decision since Congress rolled the FARM Act into the 2018 Omnibus Spending Bill as a rider.

What is the FARM Act?

The federal Fair Agriculture Reporting Method (FARM) Act is a formal, legislatively guaranteed exemption for industrial-scale livestock producers to the laws requiring other industries to report releases of hazardous materials. Read More >