CLF Aquaculture Links: June 2017

Journalist Rona Kobell takes the pulse of the aquaculture community and dissects conflicting messages from the White House. On one hand, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross wants to cut the seafood trade deficit and eliminate barriers for domestic aquaculture, but the proposed federal FY17 and FY18 budgets contain large cuts to aquaculture funding across NOAA and USDA. Read more at The Bay Journal. Read More >

CLF Aquaculture Links: March 2017

The White House proposed budget calls for large cuts to NOAA and completely removes Coastal Zone Management grants, the Sea Grant program, and the NERRS coastal research sites. These cuts will harm the ability for local and state governments to respond to climate change and storms, and will have negative impacts on businesses that rely on Sea Grant extension services, as well. The CLF has  a longstanding collaboration with staff at the Maryland Sea Grant, and we are concerned about these proposed budget cuts. Read more at the Washington Post. Read More >

Redefining Waste in Aquaponics

cilantro-dill-gutterOn the surface, the aquaponics system appears to be a replica of a natural ecosystem where the word “waste” is an artificial concept. The fish don’t excrete waste, they excrete nutrients, and the plants take up these nutrients, filtering the water for the fish. However, in our earlier post “When the Fish and Plants Don’t Get Along,” we discussed how solid accumulation on the bottom of the plant beds can lead to poor water quality. To prevent this, we employ clarifiers after the fish tanks and before our plant beds; these tanks are designed to slow the water enough to allow solids to settle. Every day we drain the sediment from the bottom of the clarifiers to remove a total of 12 gallons of muddy, solid-filled water from the system. Just because we don’t want these solids sitting beneath our plant rafts, doesn’t mean they are a waste product. In fact, the solids are loaded with valuable Read More >

International aquaculture course stresses natural systems thinking for fish farming

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the 12th annual International Aquaponics and Tilapia Aquaculture Course in St. Croix at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI). I was able to meet and learn from many wonderful people who traveled from about 21 U.S. states and 18 countries including Canada, Mexico, six Caribbean islands, Peru, Argentina, the United Kingdom, Nigeria, Singapore, and Saipan, a tiny island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Course participants ranged from commercial and aspiring farmers to backyard hobbyists, non-profit and international development workers, aquaculture extension specialists, academics, entrepreneurs, and investors.

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Charlie Schultz, course instructor, harvesting basil

Throughout the week, the course instructors emphasized that integratedfarming systems, such as aquaponics, can be more environmentally sustainable, resilient and potentially more profitable than monoculture of either fish or plant species. Course lectures included tilapia biology, broodstock spawning, fry cultivation and growout, plant propagation and hydroponics, integrated pest management, system design, and commercial considerations. Field work followed in-class lectures for hands-on learning activities.

Aquaponics is essentially a method for boosting profits from aquaculture (i.e., fish farming) by capturing excess nutrients inherent in fish waste to raise plants as a secondary revenue crop. In this regard aquaponics borrows heavily from hydroponics — a method for raising plants in a soil-less, nutrient-rich water, but it differs in one key respect. Hydroponics is performed with microbiologically clean water where all inputs come from fertilizers, while in aquaponics “we keep our system dirty” says the course’s lead instructor and UVI professor, Dr. Jim Rakocy, repeating the mantra this leader in the aquaponics movement has developed during his 30 years of research. Read More >